Monday, January 21, 2013

Artists Statements

One of the hardest tasks to do as an artist (other than organizing and inventorying one's work IMHO) is to write an artist's statement.  It can run from the simple to the complex.  The problem I have is that many time I'm not aware of the meaning inherent in some of the work until much later.  I just follow Martha Graham's advice and do the work, keeping the channel open.

“There is a vitality, a life force, a quickening that is translated through you into action, and because there is only one of you in all time, this expression is unique. If you block it, it will never exist through any other medium. It will be lost. The world will not have it. It is not your business to determine how good it is, nor how valuable it is, nor how it compares with other expressions. It is your business to keep it yours clearly and directly, to keep the channel open. You do not even have to believe in yourself or your work. You have to keep open and aware directly to the urges that motivate you. Keep the channel open. … No artist is pleased. There is no satisfaction whatever at any time. There is only a queer, divine dissatisfaction, a blessed unrest that keeps us marching and makes us more alive than the others.”

Then, my brother (video artist A Tomic Elroy) posted this link on Facebook.   Well I just had to give it a spin and found that it did a remarkably good job of writing a statement:



Ann Tracy (°1951, Waltham MA, United States) is an artist who works in a variety of media. Tracy uses references and ideas incorporated into her work that may escape those who do not take the time to explore how and why these images haunt you, like a good film, long after you’ve seen them.

Her artworks appear as dreamlike images in which fiction and reality meet, well-known tropes merge, meanings shift, past and present fuse. Time and memory always play a key role. By applying a poetic and often metaphorical language, she presents everyday objects as well as references to texts, painting and architecture. Pompous writings and Utopian constructivist designs are juxtaposed with trivial objects. Categories are subtly reversed.

She creates situations in which everyday objects are altered or detached from their natural function. By applying specific combinations and certain manipulations, different functions and/or contexts are created. With the use of appropriated materials she formalizes the coincidental and emphasizes the conscious process of composition that is behind the seemingly random works. The thought processes, which are supposedly private, highly subjective and unfiltered in their references to dream worlds, are frequently revealed as assemblages.

Her works are a drawn reflection upon the art of art itself: thoroughly self-referential, yet no less aesthetically pleasing, and therefore deeply inscribed in the history of modernism – made present most palpably in the artist’s exploration of some of the most hallowed of modernist paradigms. By experimenting with aleatoric processes, she wants to amplify the astonishment of the spectator by creating compositions or settings that generate tranquil poetic images that leave traces and balances on the edge of recognition and alienation.

Her works feature coincidental, accidental and unexpected connections which make it possible to revise art history and, even better, to complement it. Combining unrelated aspects lead to surprising analogies.  Ann Tracy currently lives and works in Portland ME.


I did do a little editing but left it as it for the most part.   The language is very "Art School" full of itself, but maybe that's what people want to see. 
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